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Best leadership advice we've learned from the children in our livesBest leadership advice we've learned from the children in our lives

The Best Leadership Advice We’ve Learned From Our Families

Good leaders know that continuous and growth and improvement are key to being successful at work and in life.

While it’s important to learn leadership skills on the job, some of the most valuable teachings come from the people in our personal lives: our grandparents, parents, siblings, nieces, nephews and close friends.

In this article, we’re sharing the best leadership advice we’ve learned from our families. Whether you’re a grandparent, parent, aunt or uncle, the people in your immediate circle can teach you a lot about how to be a successful leader.

Perfection doesn’t exist  

“I’ve learned some of the greatest leadership lessons from my niece and nephew. One of the biggest lessons is that making mistakes is part of being human. People don’t need perfection; they need someone who’s honest and real with them, who owns their mistakes, admits when they need help or when something is outside of their expertise.” 

Abby Todd, Client Services Coordinator

 

A leader puts their team first

 “The greatest lesson that I learned about leadership was the moment my first daughter was born. I quickly realized it was no longer about me, it was about her. This shift is similar in the business world when you go from being an individual contributor to a first-time manager. Over the years, I realized that leadership is a lot like parenting. In order to be a good leader at work, and a good parent at home, it’s important to recognize that it’s not all about you – it’s about your team and your kids.”

Shaun Mahoney, Founder and CEO

 

Consistency is key

“Something I learned through parenting that has helped me become a better leader is the value and importance of providing structure and consistency. Consistently find ways to frame things for people so they’re not wondering what it is that they should be doing and why. And most importantly, lead by example. Be the model of consistent behavior and actions you want your employees to follow.”

Bruce Parsons, Principal

 

Differences should be celebrated

“Growing up, I watched my parents celebrate the people in our family and their unique strengths instead of seeing them as negative differences. Their parenting and leadership styles reminds me of our teachings about DiSC communication styles — having a diverse team with a range of communication styles, interests and areas of expertise is good as long as everyone understands how to effectively and respectfully communicate with each other.”

Rachel Bahor, Digital Marketing Specialist 

 

Get comfortable releasing control

“As my children got older, I had to learn to allow and encourage them to be themselves and that included allowing for doing things very differently from how I would do them.

Our way as a leader or parents is not the only way — you have to let employees, colleagues, or children get work done their way as long as they don’t interfere with others, take way too long or never finish.”

Jim Scott, Product Development

 

What have you learned about leadership from the people in your life? Tell us in the comments below – we want to hear from you!

 

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